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Las cosas que uno medita mucho o quiere que sean 'perfectas', generalmente nunca se empiezan a hacer...
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"Cada mañana, miles de personas reanudan la búsqueda inútil y desesperada de un trabajo. Son los excluidos, una categoría nueva que nos habla tanto de la explosión demográfica como de la incapacidad de esta economía para la que lo único que no cuenta es lo humano". (Ernesto Sábato, Antes del fin)
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domingo, 10 de marzo de 2013

Cáncer de mama: dieta rica en omega 3 reduce riesgo / Guelph University

 
A lifelong diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit growth of breast cancer tumours by 30 per cent, according to new research from the University of Guelph. 
Omega-3 puede reducir el riesgo de cáncer de mama en un 30%


Las mujeres que consumen una dieta rica en...
ácidos grasos omega-3 pueden inhibir el crecimiento de tumores de cáncer de mama hasta en un 30 %, según una nueva investigación de la Universidad de Guelph.

El estudio publicado en el Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry es importante ya que si bien los omega-3 han sido siempre vistos como parte de una dieta saludable, es la primera investigación que demuestra una relación entre estos nutrientes y el riesgo reducido de contraer cáncer.

David Ma, profesor en el Departamento de Salud Humana y Ciencias Nutricionales  de Guelph y uno de los autores del estudio, dijo: “Hemos demostrado que la exposición de por vida a los omega-3 tiene un papel beneficioso en la prevención de enfermedades – en este caso, la prevención del cáncer de mama”.

Explicó que fue muy emocionante, ya que han demostrado que los omega-3 son la fuerza impulsora detrás de la protección y “no otra cosa”.

Los Omega-3 se encuentran en una gran variedad de pescados grasos como el salmón, la caballa y las sardinas, mientras que algunas verduras como las coles de Bruselas, col rizada y las espinacas son fuentes alternativas.
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Omega-3 shown to reduce breast cancer risk by 30%

Article date: 22 February 2013
Women who eat a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit growth of breast cancer tumours by up to 30 per cent, according to new research from the University of Guelph.
The study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry is significant as although omega-3s have long been seen as part of a healthy diet, it is the first piece of research to show an association between the nutrients and a reduced cancer risk.
David Ma, professor in Guelph’s Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences and one of the study’s authors, said: “We show that lifelong exposure to omega-3s has a beneficial role in disease prevention – in this case, breast cancer prevention.”
He explained that it was exciting as they have proven that omega-3s are the driving force behind the protection and “not something else”.
Omega-3s can be found in a variety of oily fish such as salmon, mackerel and sardines, while some vegetables like Brussels sprouts, kale and spinach are alternative sources.
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OMEGA-3s Inhibit Breast Cancer Tumour Growth, U of G Study Finds

http://www.uoguelph.ca/news/2013/02/omega3s_inhibit.html
February 21, 2013 – News Release
A lifelong diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids can inhibit growth of breast cancer tumours by 30 per cent, according to new research from the University of Guelph.
The study, published recently in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, is believed to be the first to provide unequivocal evidence that omega-3s reduce cancer risk.
“It’s a significant finding,” said David Ma, a professor in Guelph’s Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, and one of the study’s authors.
“We show that lifelong exposure to omega-3s has a beneficial role in disease prevention — in this case, breast cancer prevention. What’s important is that we have proven that omega-3s are the driving force and not something else.”
Breast cancer remains the most common form of cancer in women worldwide and is the second leading cause of female cancer deaths.
Advocates have long believed diet may significantly help in preventing cancer, but epidemiological and experimental studies to back up such claims have been lacking, and human studies have been inconsistent, Ma said.
“There are inherent challenges in conducting and measuring diet in such studies, and it has hindered our ability to firmly establish linkages between dietary nutrients and cancer risk,” he said. “So we’ve used modern genetic tools to address a classic nutritional question.”
For their study, the researchers created a novel transgenic mouse that both produces omega-3 fatty acids and develops aggressive mammary tumours. The team compared those animals to mice genetically engineered only to develop the same tumours.
“This model provides a purely genetic approach to investigate the effects of lifelong omega-3s exposure on breast cancer development,” Ma said. “To our knowledge, no such approach has been used previously to investigate the role of omega-3s and breast cancer.”
Mice producing omega-3s developed only two-thirds as many tumours — and tumours were also 30-per-cent smaller — as the control mice did.
“The difference can be solely attributed to the presence of omega-3s in the transgenic mice — that’s significant,” Ma said. “The fact that a food nutrient can have a significant effect on tumour development and growth is remarkable and has considerable implications in breast cancer prevention.”
Known as an expert on how fats influence health and disease, Ma hopes the study leads to more research on using diet to reduce cancer risk and on the benefits of healthy living.
“Prevention is an area of growing importance,” he said. “We are working to build a better planet, and that includes better lifestyle and diet. The long-term consequences of reducing disease incidence can have a tremendous effect on the health-care system.”
The study also involved lead author Mira MacLennan, a former U of G graduate student who is now studying medicine at Dalhousie University; U of G pathobiology professor Geoffrey Wood; former Guelph graduate students Shannon Clarke and Kate Perez; William Muller of McGill University; and Jing Kang of Harvard Medical School.
Funding for this research came from the Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance/Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario Research Fund.
Contact:
Prof. David Ma // Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences
davidma@uoguelph.ca  519 824-4120, Ext: 52272/53906
  1. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2013
  2. Diet rich in omega-3 inhibits growth of breast cancer by 30% » Isaúde

    www.isaude.net/…/diet-rich-in-omega-3-inhibits-… -
    22/02/2013 – Diet rich in omega-3 inhibits growth of breast cancer by 30%
 

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